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    To Solve Labor Shortage, Companies Turn to Automation

    Despite wage growth, the labor force participation rate remains near its lowest level since the 1970s. In the face of this shortage, companies are turning to a possible solution: automation. We talk to the CEO of a hospital system in Nevada that is hoping new technology can help the nursing shortage, and WSJ’s Josh Mitchell explains what increased investment in tech will mean for the economy and workers.   More

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    The Chappelle Controversy Tests Netflix

    After Netflix released its latest Dave Chappelle special earlier this month, the company faced strong criticism from the transgender community and its own employees. WSJ’s Joe Flint explains how the controversy has challenged Netflix’s culture of ‘radical candor’ and we go on the ground at the Netflix employee walkout.   More

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    The Facebook Files, Part 7: The AI Challenge

    Facebook’s top executives, including CEO Mark Zuckerberg, have touted the company’s progress at using artificial intelligence to police harmful content on its platform. But internally, documents show there were deep concerns about what Facebook’s AI could do.   More

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    Google's CEO on the Future of Work

    As CEO of Alphabet, Google’s parent company, Sundar Pichai is responsible for a massive, 144,000-person workforce. Right now, he’s grappling with big issues, like how tech should be regulated, how to rein in cybercrime and how (or whether) workers return to the office.   More

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    The Vaccine That Took 40 Years to Make

    The World Health Organization last week recommended the first-ever vaccine for wide use against malaria, one of the world’s deadliest diseases. Paul Kofi Awuffor, a public health worker in Ghana, shares how the vaccine can change lives, and WSJ’s Denise Roland explains this historic landmark in public health.   More

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    The Global Supply Chain Is Broken

    Since the pandemic started last year, the disruptions to the global supply chain have only gotten worse. Delays at America’s busiest commercial port, Los Angeles, are wreaking havoc on manufacturing and retail, leading the White House to get involved.   More

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    136 Countries Agree to a Global Minimum Tax

    More than 100 countries agreed last week to a 15% global minimum corporate tax. WSJ’s Richard Rubin details how the deal came together, and WSJ’s Paul Hannon explains why Ireland – which has long had some of the lowest tax rates in Europe – finally got on board.   More

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    The Unraveling of the Murdaugh Dynasty

    Over Labor Day weekend, an attempted murder was reported to police in Hampton County, S.C. involving the scion of a powerful local family. The victim, Alex Murdaugh, later said he attempted to stage his own murder to try to collect insurance money.   More

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    The Day Facebook Logged Off

    On Monday, Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp went offline for billions of people around the world. To fix it, Facebook’s employees had to physically drive to data centers to address the problem.   More

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    China's Evergrande Crisis

    Evergrande built homes for China’s growing middle class for more than two decades. Now, the property developer is running out of money. WSJ’s Quentin Webb explains how years of piling on debt brought Evergrande to a crisis point, and what its potential collapse could mean for China.   More

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    The Long Journey to Del Rio

    Last week, roughly 16,000 migrants showed up in Del Rio, Texas. Most of them were Haitian, but they didn’t come directly from Haiti. They’ve been on a long journey. WSJ’s Alicia Caldwell and Juan Montes explain how these Haitians reached Texas and what they’re encountering at the border.   More