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“American Girl” Aligns with the Destroyers of Innocence

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Photo by calicadoo on Unsplash

One of my nieces was huge into American Girl. Every birthday and probably Christmas, her mom or her godmother would purchase a new doll along with the kit, that includes clothes and a book. The website lists one kit at $115.00, but there are other bundles and the ability to create your own American Girl doll (kind of like Build A Bear) that cost a good deal more. The mothers that I know who have bought into (literally) this high-end toy do it for the world that it creates for their little girl, and the innocence and journey of girlhood it unfolds for them.

For some, it’s also a lifestyle and an inheritance. There are girls whose mothers collected American Girl dolls for them who are now girl moms themselves, and they are doing the same. So, American Girl has created a generational link, a way to bond mothers and daughters, and a cultural phenomenon in one brand.

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Well, it appears they are taking the risk to blow that brand to smithereens. Like much of corporate America, the American Girl Company (owned by Mattel) has joined the long line of companies who have signed on to indoctrinate the gender identity poison.

From The Daily Mail U.K.

The popular American Girl doll brand is facing backlash for pushing children as young as three years old into changing their gender.  

A Smart Girl’s Guide: Body Image, contains lines that give advice to prepubescents on how to change their gender – without their guardians’ blessing. Parents have since slammed the book’s contents as ‘deceptive and dangerous

A passage in the book – marketed to girls aged between three and 12 advises: ‘If you haven’t gone through puberty yet, the doctor might offer medicine to delay your body’s changes, giving you more time to think about your gender identity.’ 

It also provides a list of resources for organizations the children can turn to ‘if you don’t have an adult you trust’.

The book, penned by resident American Girl author Mel Hammond, is currently available on shelves in bookstores across the country and on the company’s website.

From the American Girl website:

Every girl needs to learn to live comfortably in her own skin, and this book will show the way! In these pages, a girl will find everything she needs to know about loving her unique self, staying confident through her body‘s many changes, and appreciating her body for the life it lets her live. Full of activities, tips, crafts, and real-girl stories, this book is a feel-good reminder that all bodies are worthy of love and respect. 96 pages. Paperback. Author: Mel Hammond.

Notice the blatant deception in the artwork. From the diversity of races and body types, including a handicapped girl, to body size. It evokes a happy, joyful, and inclusive vibe. The subtle deception gets less subtle as the 96-page volume unfolds:

GENDER JOY:

The way you show your gender to the world through clothes and behaviors is your gender expression. Your gender expression can be feminine, masculine, or somewhere in between–and it might change! Maybe you’ll experiment with bright dresses and long, feminine hairstyles. Or you might try baggy shorts, plaid shirts, and a buzzed haircut. Your gender should make you feel at home in your body.

This book is marketed to girls 3-12 years of age, and encourages transgenderism, including embedding the idea of taking puberty blockers, changing clothes, and even more dastardly, offering organizations that a girl can talk with when they cannot talk to their parents.

Another institution creating a wedge between the parent and the child. So much for the mother-daughter bonding aspect.

If you haven’t gone through puberty yet, the doctor might offer medicine to delay your body’s changes, giving you more time to think about your gender identity.

Understandably, loyal and committed American Girl customers are completely floored by this sea change—and none too pleased.

This is not American Girl’s first foray into the LGBTQ extra plus world. This push started long before, but it was rolled out subtly, with changes to language and characters in the books. The company did its first big character doll reveal in 2021.

At the end of December, Mattel unveiled its “2021 Girl of the Year,” a 10-year-old named Kira Bailey from Michigan who’s passionate about climate change’s impact on wildlife. In the accompanying book Kira Down Under, the girl visits an animal sanctuary in Australia operated by her great-aunts Mamie and Lynette, who are in a same-sex marriage. Kira is not the brand’s first dive into LGBT content — the September advice book A Smart Girl’s Guide: Crushes (formerly A Smart Girl’s Guide to Boys) was updated to include same-sex relationships and in February, American Girl will publish the book Pets, featuring a mixed-race family with two dads, following 2019’s Understanding Families about diverse family structures.

Let the buyer beware. Sadly, with these corporations, you are no longer buying a product, you are endorsing the transgender agenda and the destruction of children.

In My Orbit with Jennifer Oliver O’Connell is a reader-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber.

Written by CONK!

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