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    Political Conspiracy Thinking Then and Now

    Conspiratorial thinking has a long history in American politics. And yet, it’s tempting to think about our current moment as a golden age of conspiratorial thinking. Jesse Walker of Reason magazine traces the history.   More

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    The Globalized Race for a COVID-19 Vaccine

    Countries across the globe are working toward the development of a COVID-19 vaccine. How might the late protectionism of the United States affect that effort? Scott Lincicome comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.   More

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    North Korea’s Parade of New Military Hardware

    What can we infer from the new weaponry unveiled by North Korea? Eric Gomez and Doug Bandow describe how the U.S., South Korea, and China ought to respond. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.   More

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    American Election Security in 2020

    The United States seems unprepared for a wide variety of ways in which elections might be disrupted. One saving grace, says Brandon Valeriano, is the distributed nature of American elections. See acast.com/privacy   More

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    Some Bad Arguments in Favor of Qualified Immunity

    The judicial doctrine known as qualified immunity is being misrepresented by law enforcement advocates. The only remaining question is whether those advocates understand the doctrine at all. Jay Schweikert details the errors.   More

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    Rising Fears of an End to Legal Gay Marriage

    Some comments by Justice Clarence Thomas made in an opinion earlier this week appear to some to indicate a desire to overturn the Obergefell decision that legalized same-sex marriage nationwide. Walter Olson discusses the fear and its basis.   More

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    Health Care Regulation's Pandemic Errors

    Jeff Singer’s Pandemics and Policy essay details the combination of officious health care regulation and viral pandemic that have worsened economic and health outcomes for those affected. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.   More

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    Public Health, Private Decisions, and COVID-19

    Science is great, but scientific determinations do not and should not dictate all behavior. Peter VanDoren discusses some of the limits of science in his new Pandemics and Policy essay. See acast.com/privacy   More

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    What We Need to Know about Nuclear Weapons

    What do we need to know now about nuclear weapons policy? Cato’s Eric Gomez wrote the lead essay for this month’s edition of Cato Unbound. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.   More

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    Amy Coney Barrett and Government Accountability

    Would a Justice Amy Coney Barrett hold government officials to high standards? With whom is she most aligned on the High Court? Andrew Grossman explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.   More

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    Amy Coney Barrett and Judicial Philosophy

    What do Amy Coney Barrett’s writings and judicial opinions tell us about her judicial philosophy? Casey Mattox, Vice President for Legal & Judicial Strategy and Americans for Prosperity gives his take.   More

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    Julian Assange’s Extradition and Press Freedom

    What does the fight over bringing Julian Assange to the U.S. to face espionage charges mean for press freedom? J.D. Tuccille of Reason Magazine comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.   More

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    Preserving Free Trade in a Pandemic

    Many critical supply chains have suffered during the pandemic, which means everyone along those supply chains has also suffered. Dan Ikenson details how to make sure trade isn’t a casualty of this pandemic.   More

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    Breonna Taylor, Indicting Cops, and the War on Drugs

    One of three Louisville police officers involved in the raid on Breonna Taylor’s home has been charged with crimes. The charges are for behavior not strictly related to Taylor’s death. Clark Neily discusses what it should mean for police reform.   More