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All posts tagged "Environment"

  • The warmth and wisdom of mud buildings | Anna Heringer

    “There are a lot of resources given by nature for free — all we need is our sensitivity to see them and our creativity to use them,” says architect Anna Heringer.

    CONKOctober 18, 2017
  • The fascinating secret lives of giant clams | Mei Lin Neo

    When you think about the deep blue sea, you might instantly think of whales or coral reefs. But spare a thought for giant clams, the world’s largest living shellfish. These incredible creatures can live to 100, grow up to four and a half feet long and weigh as much as three baby elephants.

    CONKOctober 13, 2017
  • What it feels like to see Earth from space | Benjamin Grant

    What the astronauts felt when they saw Earth from space changed them forever. Author and artist Benjamin Grant aims to provoke this same feeling of overwhelming scale and beauty in each of us through a series of stunning satellite images that show the effects human beings are having on the planet.

    CONKSeptember 22, 2017
  • Would you live in a floating city in the sky? (with English subtitles) | Tomás Saraceno

    (Full English subtitles are available for this talk — click the CC button in the bottom right of your screen to turn subtitles on.) In a mind-bending talk that blurs the line between science and art, Tomás Saraceno exhibits a series of air-inspired sculptures and installations designed to usher in a new era of sustainability, the “Aerocene.” Check out more TED Talks: The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less).

    CONKSeptember 21, 2017
  • A smog vacuum cleaner and other magical city designs | Daan Roosegaarde

    Daan Roosegaarde uses technology and creative thinking to produce imaginative, earth-friendly designs. He presents his latest projects — from the sidewalks of Amsterdam, where he reinterpreted “The Starry Night” to get people thinking about green energy, to Beijing, where he developed a smog vacuum cleaner to purify the air in local parks, to a dance floor that generates electricity to power a DJ booth.

    CONKSeptember 20, 2017
  • Why I still have hope for coral reefs | Kristen Marhaver

    Corals in the Pacific Ocean have been dying at an alarming rate, particularly from bleaching brought on by increased water temperatures. But it’s not too late to act, says TED Fellow Kristen Marhaver.

    CONKAugust 12, 2017
  • Can clouds buy us more time to solve climate change? | Kate Marvel

    Climate change is real, case closed. But there’s still a lot we don’t understand about it, and the more we know the better chance we have to slow it down. One still-unknown factor: How might clouds play a part?

    CONKAugust 1, 2017
  • When I die, recompose me | Katrina Spade

    What if our bodies could help grow new life after we die, instead of being embalmed and buried or turned to ash? Join Katrina Spade as she discusses “recomposition” — a system that uses the natural decomposition process to turn our deceased into life-giving soil, honoring both the earth and the departed.

    CONKJuly 18, 2017
  • How pollution is changing the ocean’s chemistry | Triona McGrath

    As we keep pumping carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, more of it is dissolving in the oceans, leading to drastic changes in the water’s chemistry. Triona McGrath researches this process, known as ocean acidification, and in this talk she takes us for a dive into an oceanographer’s world.

    CONKJune 20, 2017
  • A secret weapon against Zika and other mosquito-borne diseases | Nina Fedoroff

    Where did Zika come from, and what can we do about it? Molecular biologist Nina Fedoroff takes us around the world to understand Zika’s origins and how it spread, proposing a controversial way to stop the virus — and other deadly diseases — by preventing infected mosquitoes from multiplying.

    CONKJune 16, 2017
  • How human noise affects ocean habitats | Kate Stafford

    Oceanographer Kate Stafford lowers us into the sonically rich depths of the Arctic Ocean, where ice groans, whales sing to communicate over vast distances — and climate change and human noise threaten to alter the environment in ways we don’t understand.

    CONKJune 6, 2017
  • Science in service to the public good | Siddhartha Roy

    We give scientists and engineers great technical training, but we’re not as good at teaching ethical decision-making or building character. Take, for example, the environmental crisis that recently unfolded in Flint, Michigan — and the professionals there who did nothing to fix it.

    CONKMay 23, 2017
  • In praise of conflict | Jonathan Marks

    Conflict is bad; compromise, consensus and collaboration are good — or so we’re told. Lawyer and bioethicist Jonathan Marks challenges this conventional wisdom, showing how governments can jeopardize public health, human rights and the environment when they partner with industry.

    CONKMay 9, 2017
  • The future we’re building — and boring | Elon Musk

    Elon Musk discusses his new project digging tunnels under LA, the latest from Tesla and SpaceX and his motivation for building a future on Mars in conversation with TED’s Head Curator, Chris Anderson.

    CONKMay 4, 2017
  • A burial practice that nourishes the planet | Caitlin Doughty

    Here’s a question we all have to answer sooner or later: What do you want to happen to your body when you die? Mortician and funeral director Caitlin Doughty explores new ways to prepare us for inevitable mortality.

    CONKApril 4, 2017
  • This app makes it fun to pick up litter | Jeff Kirschner

    The earth is a big place to keep clean. With Litterati — an app for users to identify, collect and geotag the world’s litter — TED Resident Jeff Kirschner has created a community that’s crowdsource-cleaning the planet.

    CONKMarch 23, 2017
  • A robot that eats pollution | Jonathan Rossiter

    Meet the “Row-bot,” a robot that cleans up pollution and generates the electricity needed to power itself by swallowing dirty water. Roboticist Jonathan Rossiter explains how this special swimming machine, which uses a microbial fuel cell to neutralize algal blooms and oil slicks, could be a precursor to biodegradable, autonomous pollution-fighting robots.

    CONKMarch 16, 2017
  • Art made of the air we breathe | Emily Parsons-Lord

    Emily Parsons-Lord re-creates air from distinct moments in Earth’s history — from the clean, fresh-tasting air of the Carboniferous period to the soda-water air of the Great Dying to the heavy, toxic air of the future we’re creating.

    CONKFebruary 9, 2017