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    The unemployed are often locked out of low-rate refi market

    Mortgage interest rates have been historically low for the past year — at or below 3%. However, many banks have kept in place Great Recession-era proof of employment requirements. This means that those who lost their jobs during the pandemic and could benefit the most from refinancing are often unable to.   More

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    Gentrification meets Texas barbecue

    Historically, barbecue has been a cheap and delicious way to cook meat — principally by Black pitmasters who lived in poverty. Now, ‘cue joints win prestigious awards and can charge top dollar.   More

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    A look at the child care crisis

    The child care industry was struggling even before the pandemic. Costs are high for parents who need the service to enable them to work, yet employee wages rank low among professions.   More

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    Americans are quitting their jobs in record numbers

    Though unemployment levels are dipping, some 4.3 million people left their jobs in August, according to a new Bureau of Labor Statistics report. The “quits rate” is up to 2.9% — the highest it’s been since the BLS started tracking it.   More

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    Why so many products are “temporarily unavailable”

    If you’ve tried to buy much of anything lately, there’s a decent chance some of the products you’ve been scouring aisles for have been out of stock. On today’s show, we air the first segment in our new collection, “Temporarily Unavailable,” which explores how stuff moves around the world … or doesn’t.   More

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    How “Squid Game” took over fall TV

    People fall into one of two TV camps right now: You’ve either seen “Squid Game” or you haven’t. But odds are you’ve heard of the dystopian South Korean drama, which is  on track to be Netflix’s most-watched show yet.   More

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    Could this be the start of a new labor movement?

    The pandemic has helped shift power in the economy from employers to workers. Public support for unions is among the highest its been in recent years. On today’s show, Liz Shuler, president of the AFL-CIO, discusses what she sees as the beginning stages of a modern labor movement that can grow and change with the needs of working people.   More

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    The families the child tax credit has left behind

    Some families that include undocumented immigrants are reporting that, despite being eligible, they’ve yet to receive the child tax credit. Chabeli Carrazana, an economy reporter at The 19th, tells us about how those who need it most face barriers to accessing the federal aid.   More

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    The past and future of unionizing restaurant workers

    The food-and-beverage industry has one of the lowest unionization rates among the U.S. workforce, but that wasn’t always the case. Now, organizing momentum is building. And public support for unions coupled with the stresses of COVID-19 could provide a boost to those efforts.   More

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    What happens if we blow past the debt limit?

    If the debt ceiling is reached without being suspended or raised by Congress, the Treasury will have to choose between paying its bills and repaying money already borrowed. Results could be catastrophic.   More

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    A rodeo returns with fanfare and few masks

    For many towns in the West and Midwest, rodeos are a boon to the local economy. Despite the delta variant’s surge, many rodeos have made a return in 2021. Marketplace’s Mitchell Hartman takes us to Oregon’s Pendleton Round-Up and chats with locals, tourists and health officials about mask enforcement, a boost to business and the return of a rural tradition.   More

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    The Fed is cautiously optimistic on recovery

    The economy is growing strongly as it recovers from its pandemic-induced downturns — so strongly that the Fed has signaled it will start tapering bond purchases soon and may raise interest rates next year.   More

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    How one massive Chinese company rattled the U.S. stock market

    Anxiety over Evergrande, a behemoth property developer in China, and its $300 billion debt sent stock markets around the globe tumbling on Monday. The situation is spotlighting precarity in China’s real estate sector and the country’s economy as a whole; some fear a Lehman Brothers-style crisis.   More