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    The Biden Supreme Court Commission

    On April 9, 2021, President Biden issued Executive Order 14023 forming the Presidential Commission on the Supreme Court of the United States. The Commission is comprised of a bipartisan group of experts on the Court—from former federal judges and practitioners, to legal scholars and historians—who have been tasked with analyzing arguments and the merits and legality of proposals in the current public debate for and against Supreme Court reform.   More

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    Should Congress Regulate Facebook?

    Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen recently testified before the Senate Subcommittee on Consumer Protection, telling senators that Facebook and Instagram stoke division, harm children, and avoid transparency and any consequences for their damaging effects.   More

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    The Supreme Court’s “Shadow Docket”

    Last week, Supreme Court Justice Samuel A. Alito gave a speech responding to criticism of the Supreme Court’s emergency docket levied by, among others, his fellow Justices Elena Kagan and Stephen Breyer.   More

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    Supreme Court 2021-22 Term Preview

    Monday, October 4, will be the first day of oral arguments in the new 2021-22 Supreme Court term. On this week’s episode, Supreme Court journalists Kimberly Atkins Stohr of Boston Globe Opinion and Jess Bravin of The Wall Street Journal join host Jeffrey Rosen to preview the forthcoming term’s blockbuster cases on issues including abortion, religion, guns, free speech, state secrets, and more.   More

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    James Madison, Ratification, and the Federalist Papers

    September 17 is Constitution Day—the anniversary of the Framers signing the Constitution in 1787. This week’s episode dives into what happened after the Constitution was signed—when it had to be approved “we the people,” a process known as ratification—and the arguments made on behalf of the Constitution.   More

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    James Madison, Ratification, and the Federalist Papers

    September 17 is Constitution Day—the anniversary of the framers signing the Constitution in 1787. This week’s episode dives into what happened after the Constitution was signed—when it had to be approved by “we the people,” a process known as ratification—and the arguments made on behalf of the Constitution.   More

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    The Texas Abortion Law and the Future of Roe

    Last week, the Supreme Court declined to temporarily halt, and thus allowed to go into effect, a new Texas law that bans abortion after six weeks of pregnancy—effectively banning most abortions in the state.   More

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    Can Governors Ban School Mask Mandates?

    Legal battles over masks in schools are being fought across the country—in states including Arkansas, California, Florida, Kentucky, Michigan, Oklahoma, Nevada and Texas—and the U.S. Department of Education recently announced a civil rights investigation into mask mandate bans in several states.    More

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    The Story of the 26th Amendment

    This year marks the 50th anniversary of the passage of the 26th Amendment, which lowered the voting age to 18. This week’s episode tells the fascinating story of the amendment—sparked by two wars and the idea of “old enough to fit, old enough to vote,” principally designed by two senators, and advocated for by countless young people, students, and civil rights activists.   More

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    The Story of the 26th Amendment

    This year marks the 50th anniversary of the passage of the 26th Amendment, which lowered the voting age to 18. This week’s episode tells the fascinating story of the amendment—sparked by two wars and the idea of “old enough to fit, old enough to vote,” principally designed by two senators, and advocated for by countless young people, students, and civil rights activists.   More

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    The Revolutionary Life of Mercy Otis Warren

    This week’s episode profiles Mercy Otis Warren—a trailblazing woman who was one of the leading thinkers of America’s Revolutionary and Founding period. A poet, playwright, and pamphleteer—Warren’s ideas influenced John, Abigail, and Samuel Adams as well as Alexander Hamilton and others, and even helped shape the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.   More

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    The “Eviction Moratorium” and the Constitution

    On August 3, the Biden Administration issued an order from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention creating a second “eviction moratorium” that extended the pause on eviction proceedings in state courts during the pandemic—sparking debate over whether such an action was legal and constitutional.   More

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    Are Vaccine Mandates Constitutional?

    As students return to school, hundreds of colleges and universities are requiring those returning to campus to get coronavirus vaccines. Recently, a federal appeals court declined to grant an injunction against Indiana University’s vaccine mandate after it was challenged in a lawsuit by students who say it violates their constitutional rights.   More

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    Will President Biden Transform Antitrust?

    President Biden recently issued the Executive Order on Competition which aims to break up corporate power across the economy—proposing antitrust initiatives at more than a dozen federal agencies including the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).   More

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    Benjamin Franklin and the Constitution

    Benjamin Franklin is well known as a Founding Father and an innovative inventor, scientist, and diplomat. But did you know he had a major and often unsung role at the Constitutional Convention?   More

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    Brnovich v. DNC, The Supreme Court, and Voting Rights

    Last week, the Supreme Court released its opinion in Brnovich v. Democratic National Committee—upholding two Arizona voting rules by deciding that they did not violate the Voting Rights Act or the Constitution and were not enacted with a racially discriminatory purpose.   More

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    A Constitutional Commemoration of Independence Day

    As Americans look forward to celebrating Independence Day this holiday weekend, this week’s episode dives into the Declaration of Independence. We trace where its words and its ideals came from and how it went on to influence state constitutions, the United States constitution, and other key American texts including President Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address and Rev.   More

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    A Constitutional Commemoration of Independence Day

    As Americans look forward to celebrating Independence Day this holiday weekend, this week’s episode dives into the Declaration of Independence. We trace where its words and its ideals came from and how it went on to influence state constitutions, the U.S.   More